Crane Country Day School Established 1928

Crane School Blog: Focus on Learning

Featuring articles written by Crane Staffulty

For more information about Crane Country Day School, please contact admission@craneschool.org or call 805-969-7732 x127.

Recycling at Crane
Ryan Long

The reality of modern life is that each of us creates waste in the wake of our consumption. Beverages that we drink come in bottles, cartons or cans, most of the foods we eat come bagged or boxed in plastic, and many of the household and personal care items we use come in tubes or jugs. When we are finished with the products, we must decide where the containers will go. Here in Santa Barbara, the options are clear: brown garbage can or blue recycling bin...

The reality of modern life is that each of us creates waste in the wake of our consumption. Beverages that we drink come in bottles, cartons or cans, most of the foods we eat come bagged or boxed in plastic, and many of the household and personal care items we use come in tubes or jugs. When we are finished with the products, we must decide where the containers will go. Here in Santa Barbara, the options are clear: brown garbage can or blue recycling bin.

What goes in which receptacle, however, is a more complicated question. Marborg, our local waste management company, is often adjusting what they will and will not accept, which causes public confusion. These guidelines change based on what the companies that buy the plastic, paper, metal and glass are willing to purchase. Most of our recyclables end up across the world in countries including China and Vietnam, where they can be turned into new products. In 2018, China banned imported scrap material loads that exceed 0.5 percent contamination. As a result, many usable recyclables get thrown out because they are mixed with improperly sorted items. Marborg reports that 18.8 percent of blue bin content in the city is trash, which far exceeds the contamination rate. 

According to the new recycling guidelines that were released in January, many of the things that were recyclable in the past are no longer accepted. These include plastic food containers that hold salsa, yogurt, hummus, or berries. Paper food and beverage containers including milk cartons and Tetrapack (many juice, soup and nondairy milk boxes) have also been removed. Marborg continues to reject styrofoam, all plastic bags and film plastic, wrappers, pizza boxes, and all paper and plastic straws, cups, plates, and utensils.

At Crane, we are working to prevent contamination and keep recyclables from ending up in the landfill. We can all do our part to help Mr. Caretto and the fifth grade recycling team with their efforts to reduce waste. This means only putting the following in our blue bins:

  • Plastic beverage and household bottles with caps on
  • Paper bags, copy paper, newspapers, and flattened cardboard
  • Aluminum cans, trays, and foil
  • Glass bottles and jars

In all cases, these items must be empty, clean and dry! When in doubt, throw it out. 

Check out the current recycling guide below and talk with your children about what should go in each bin. By consuming thoughtfully and sorting correctly, we can save energy and water, use less fossil fuel, cut fewer trees, and keep raw materials in the earth.

Ryan Long
Service Learning Coordinator & Director of After-School Programs

 

Most Recent Posts

 Focus on Learning-Logos Pathos Ethos

Crane's seventh grade English students found out that the simple question, "What is your favorite sandwich?" isn't actually as simple as they had originally believed. Little did they know that this question would lead them to the theory of persuasion and the study of Aristotle's three modes - logos, ethos, and pathos.

As English teacher Mrs. Lombardi shared with seventh grade parents, "Understanding how to persuade others and also how one is persuaded by others are both important tools to have in one's kit"...

Its just middle school photo

This image is prominently displayed on our seventh grade dean’s website. It’s a bit of comic relief to combat the bad rap that the middle school years get. And it is a perfect example of one of the goals of the new Grade Level Dean program in the Upper School (sixth-eighth grades) at Crane School - to add an element of fun to the social lives of middle school students.

The Grade Level Dean program focuses on the social aspect of the middle school experience at Crane. As a school we are constantly assessing what changes we can make...

Focus on Learning Gratitude

While gratitude may be a buzzword, especially in the month of November, we believe it is much more than a popular hashtag (#grateful) or a fleeting trend. Gratitude is a powerful tool that has proven to positively affect individuals and communities.

In an article titled, What is Gratitude and Why Is It So Important? from positivepsychology.com, Courtney E. Ackerman, MSc states, “Effectively gratitude can create social networks and help individuals work towards goals and challenges, and overall, simply have stronger coping skills for life’s hardships.”

At Crane it has been inspiring and heart-warming to see students of all ages learning the independent practice of gratitude...

Blog Image: How was your day?

In the past seven months, most parents have been more involved in their children’s academic lives than ever before. We know what sight words they have been working on, what the all-school art project is, and who presented in the Friday assembly video.

However, as Crane School students in all nine grades now have the option to learn on campus, the majority of parents are once again receiving less information about the day-to-day activities both in the classroom and on the playground.

We have all asked the question and gotten the dreaded answer. You know the one. Parents enthusiastically ask, “How was your day!?!” The response is an annoyed or indifferent, “Fine,” “Okay,” or possibly just an undecipherable grunt...